Polish dill pickles (ogórki kiszone), are tangy pickles, that don’t need to be fermented in barrels like in the old days. Kosher salt and lactic acid from vinegar speed up the fermenting process! To get crisp pickles, pick your cucumbers small and use pickling cucumbers with prickly skins! Processing in a water bath or oven will extend the pickle life throughout the winter, although sterilizing the jars is not required for refrigerated pickles (they will just have a shorter life span.) 

polish dill pickle recipe

These Polish dill pickles taste just like the jarred ones from the Polish store! Belveder Polish dill pickles are everything dill pickles should taste like and now you can make them at home, easily! We love preserving food! Try our Canned Marinara Sauce, Canned Peach Mango Salsa, or Pickled Tomatoes

Dill Pickle Recipe

This canned pickles recipe was a recipe that I’ve adapted from traditional Polish pickles, only to improve the recipe to the ones I used to buy from the store! It has the perfect balance of salted, dill pickles with a touch of sweetness to cut down the tanginess. Best of all they remain pleasantly tangy and perfect to a side of Mashed Potatoes or Mom’s Pork Meatballs.  

Water Bath or Oven-Canning? 

Are canning jars in the oven, safe? That’s the way my mother-in-law does it and back in the old days you canned by word of mouth. Someone would can in a particular village one way and if it turned out you stick to it! The good news is it still works today with fantastic results–especially for bulk canning! 

When cucumber season hits-canning helps preserve them to longer shelf life! Pickled cucumbers are done easily with this oven method and they taste just like my favorite brand. Canning jars in the oven is the old-fashioned way to can lots of jars in bulk. Canning pickles in a water bath at home, is more practical for smaller batches of pickles and can be more of a hassle to bring so much water to a boil.

Back in the old days they would do the canning outside in a huge tin tub for bulk canning. The heating source was firweood. Now a days we have electric and gas stoves we can easily adjust the heat to. Thankfully, I own these two large pots for canning and if you’re into the water bath method than invest in these canning pieces 40-Quart Heavy Duty Stock Pot and a 24-Quart Heavy Duty Stock Pot. However its easier, to invest in this sheet pan to do some canning in the oven. 

To take all precautions of canning in the oven be sure to follow the instructions carefully. Each step is needed for successful results. Never seal the lids before baking and pour water into the sheet pan to prevent the cans from bursting. It is always a good idea to start canning in a cold oven and allow the jars to reach the desired heat slowly. Never place jars into a boiling water bath or hot oven–the jars can burst. 

Polish Pickles

I love Belveder polish pickles (my favorite canned pickles) and when I experimented with some brine recipes, I got a winner. I cannot rave enough about these Polish dill pickles they are the best copycat to Belveder’s brand and super simple to make. Not sure how to use up pickles? Try our Olivye (Ukrainian potato salad) or pickle soup!

This recipe is adaptable since you can adjust the ingredients by the yield of cucumbers on hand. I like to can pickles in 1-quart jars although some bigger cucumbers fit better in half-gallon jars. The pickles are ready to eat after canning, however, letting the pickles sit in the brine after a month (4-5 weeks) can enhance the flavor.

 FAQ:

What are Dill Pickles?

Garden cucumbers are pickled in a brine of vinegar, salt, and a water solution to preserve the cucumbers. To longer preserve the pickles– techniques like canning or souring by Lacto-fermentation can prolong the eating of sour pickles throughout the winter months.

Although pickled cucumbers vary in brines you will notice most recipes consist of a few of the same brine ingredients-water, vinegar, kosher salt (or pickling salt), and sometimes sugar. Spices for pickling include mustard seeds, fresh garlic cloves, peppercorns, dill flowers (dill stems with flowers), and leaves (bay, grape, horseradish, current, or walnut leaves.)

Each culture uses ingredients easily available-especially from the garden. Polish dill pickles can be a tart and sweet pickle as sliced vegetables are sometimes added to each jar. Sliced carrots, sweet bell peppers, and onions are sometimes found in the store pickles and that is because it infuses the pickles with flavor!

Ukrainian and Russian Dill pickles are very similar to a Polish dill pickle. Every recipe varies according to preference-more tart, sweet and sour, or sugar-free. We like our pickles in between. Tart and a little sweet to cut the sour taste.

Dill Pickles vs Polish Dill Pickles

Dill pickles vary from recipe to recipe as each brine consists of different proportions of sugar, water, and vinegar. Some can be sweet while others are more sour. Add-ins can also make a difference in taste and appearance. I find Polish dill pickles to be sweet and sour, but yet tangy. 

Ingredients Needed?

  • Fresh Cucumbers-
  • Water- the base of the pickle brine. 
  • Vinegar- is the lactic acid that gives pickles its fermented flavor without souring long. 
  • Sugar- cuts the tartness down.  
  • Kosher Salt- use pickling salt if you don’t have kosher salt. Do not use iodized salt. 
  • Sliced Onions- infuses the brine and pickles. 
  • Whole peppercorns- added to the jars before the brine. 
  • Garlic Cloves- add whole cloves or slice them in half to bring out the garlic flavor. 
  • Bay Leaves- use whole bay leaves or other leaves easily available to you. Different canning leaves include current, walnut, or horseradish leaves.
  • Dill Stems- with the flowers. 

Note: If you have whole mustard seeds use them. Ground mustard will make the brine cloudy. 

How To Make Dill Pickles Step-By-Step:

A dill pickle can be canned two ways–a water bath method or the oven method. Canning jars in the oven is the old-fashioned way to can lots of jars in bulk for the typical home cook. Canning pickles in a water bath is more practical for smaller batches of pickles at home.

If you have a bigger pot canning can be done easier outside on a propane stove or by running two burners on the regular stove. Just remember you need a very large pot unless you don’t mind canning batches after batches in one standard (5-quart) pot.

Then you would need to remove some boiling water with cold water and bring the water to a boil again with the jars since you do not want to submerge jars into boiling water–they can burst that way. 

 

  1. Wash and trim the cucumbers. Set aside. 
  2. Prepare the jars: wash the lids and jars with hot soapy water. Do not wash rings they can get rusty. 
  3. Evenly divide the onion slices, whole peppercorns, dill stems, bay leaves, and garlic into 4 (1-quart) jars. 
  4. Pack cucumbers tightly into each jar and set them aside. 
  5. Meanwhile, bring all the brine ingredients to a boil. Pour over each jar.
  6. Place jars onto a sheet pan filled with water and loosely place the lids on top. Place into the oven and set at 350°F. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until little bubbles, float to the top of the cucumbers (cucumbers should turn into a dull green shade.) 
  7. Carefully, remove the pan from the oven and seal each jar shut using oven mittens or a thick kitchen towel. 
  8. Cool jars completely before checking if they sealed (after 24 hours.) 

To Check if lids are sealed: when you push in the middle of the lid, it should not pop up and down. If you hear a pop or a clicking sound the seal did not form and the jar needs to be used up or refrigerated. Properly sealed pickles can last years! 

Home Canning Tools:

With the right knowledge, some kitchen equipment, canning can become an easy task! Here is what you’ll need:

  • 4 Quart Sized (Wide-Mouth) Mason jars, with rings, and lids. More cucumbers yield more jars, etc.
  • Large Sheet-Pan. 
  • Jar lifter to carefully transfer the hot jars. 
  • Oven-Mittens or thick kitchen towel. 

Have old mason jars? Don’t toss them! You can re-use old jars and bands just purchase new lids to ensure proper sealing. Here is some very handy equipment that has helped me with making canning easier!

  • funnel-such a nice tool to pour liquid into the jars without a huge mess!
  • canner– so convenient for processing lots of jars! Using a regular pot can call for multiple batches since not all cans can fit at one time but this canner is spacious! And you can double stack pint-sized jars!

This Polish Dill Pickle Recipe is EASY:

The method for canning these sweet and salty pickles is not your typical water bath method! The oven can make canning a breeze since your not bringing water to a boil or creating extra condensation in the house!

You simply pour some water into a sheet pan and place all the assembled jars right in! Place into the oven and wait until the oven brings the brine to a simmer to sterilize and seal the jars properly. 

Don’t feel safe canning in the oven? This recipe works for a water bath method too! Simply follow the preparation for dill pickles and loosely place the bands and lids on each jar. Transfer into a large stockpot. Fill with warm water 3/4 of the jars (just below the headspace.) Bring water to a boil and time the water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars with a jar lifter and seal each jar shut. 

While the jars cool you should hear a pop–that means the jars are sealing. 

How to Serve Dill Pickles?

Pickles are great to almost any potato side! Here are some ideas! 

Which Pickles for Canning and Preserving?

Little cucumbers are best for pickling! They can stay crisp and crunchy if made properly. Avoid large cucumbers as they can hold many seeds and can turn soft if processed too long. 

Best cucumbers to grow for pickling can include pickling cucumbers and Cucumber Seeds like Amour (Ukrainian sort.) 

Can you reuse Canning Lids? 

If the lids are not damaged, you can reuse the lids. I like to place my used lids into a saucepan and bring it to a boil to ensure they sterilize properly and heat back into shape. Avoid dented, bulged, or damaged lids. If lids fail to seal always toss them. 

Is Canning in the Oven Safe?

Processing can be safe in the oven. You want to follow all precautions of canning in the oven, carefully before you begin. I’ve had successful results canning goods in the oven, and so has my mother for many years!

A water bath method can easily be handled with this recipe, however, if you yielding lots of cucumbers the oven method is your better option! 

  • Never seal the lids before baking.
  • Pour water into the sheet pan to prevent the cans from bursting.
  • It is always a good idea to start canning in a cold oven and allow the jars to reach the desired heat SLOWLY.
  • Never place jars into a boiling water bath or hot oven–the jars can burst. 

Can I Do Water Bath Method?

Yes! Simply follow the preparation for dill pickles and loosely place the bands and lids on each jar. Transfer into a large stockpot.

Fill with warm water 3/4 of the jars (just below the headspace.) Bring water to a boil and time the water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars with a jar lifter and seal each jar shut. 

While the jars cool you should hear a pop–that means the jars are sealing. 

How To Know if My Canning Lids Sealed?

To Check if lids are sealed: when you push in the middle of the lid, it should not pop up and down. If you hear a pop or a clicking sound the seal did not form and the jar needs to be used up or refrigerated. Properly sealed pickles can last years!  

Current Canning Guidelines? 

For the most current canning guideline on pickles from the National Center For Home Food Preservation check out these resources for canning in this canning guideline article

How Can You Tell if Canned Food is Spoiled? 

Discard and avoid eating any canned foods that might be suspicious. Canned food with mold or unpleasant smells should be avoided and discarded. 

BEST Tips for Crunchy Dill Pickles:

  1. Don’t process for too long! Once the water boils (for the water bath method) or the oven heats up, set the timer! A water bath takes 10 minutes from the time it boils. If canning in the oven set the timer when the oven preheats with the jars. 
  2. The smaller and fresher the cucumbers-the better! Smaller cucumbers can stay very crisp since they don’t have as many seeds and don’t soften like larger cucumbers. Plus you can pack more cucumbers into jars! 
  3. Trim off the ends of each cucumber. 
  4. Pack cucumbers just below the headspace of the canning jars. You don’t want your lids to bulge. 
  5. Mix and match the spices and leaves per availability! Don’t be intimidated to slice in some fresh veggies like carrots or red bell peppers! 
  6. Both, water bath and oven methods will work for canning these pickles.
  7. When processing always, gradually heat the jars to prevent jars from exploding.
  8. Reuse your rings and jars! New lids are recommended, however, I’ve reused lids that were in good shape successfully! Bring reused lids to a boil before using. 
  9. Once jars have sealed (after 24-hours) unscrew the rings to prevent them from rusting and gluing on. 

Family-Favorite Canned Recipes:

Canned Polish Dill Pickle Recipe: 

Polish Dill Pickles

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 4 quarts
Author: Alyona's Cooking
These Polish dill pickles taste just like the jarred ones from the store! Belveder Polish dill pickles are everything dill pickles should taste like and now you can make them at home, easily!

Equipment

  • sheet-pan
  • Jars, lids, and bands (rings.)
  • Jar lifter

Ingredients

Pickles

  • 4 lbs cucumbers (washed and trimmed)
  • 1 small onion thinly sliced
  • 20 peppercorns
  • 2 dill stems with flowers cut into 3" pieces
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves halved

Brine

  • 5 cups water
  • 1 cup vinegar
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp salt

Instructions

How to make Polish Dill Pickles

  • Prepare the jars: wash the lids and jars with hot soapy water. Do not wash rings they can get rusty.
  • Evenly divide the onion slices, whole peppercorns, dill stems, bay leaves, and garlic into 4 (1-quart) jars. Pack cucumbers tightly into each jar and set them aside.
  • Meanwhile, bring all the brine ingredients to a boil. Pour over each jar and fill just below the headspace.
  • Place jars onto a sheet pan filled with water and loosely place the lids and rings on top of the jars. Place into the oven and set at 350°F. Bake for 20 minutes or until little bubbles, float to the top of the cucumbers (cucumbers should turn into a dull green shade.) 
  • Carefully, remove the pan from the oven and seal each jar shut using oven mittens or a thick kitchen towel. Cool jars completely before checking if they sealed (after 24 hours.) 

Notes

  • To Check if lids are sealed: when you push in the middle of the lid, it should not pop up and down. If you hear a pop or a clicking sound the seal did not form and the jar needs to be used up or refrigerated. Properly sealed pickles can last years! 
  • Water Bath Method: follow my given instructions under Q&A. 
  • Can add: mustard seeds, diced carrots, sliced sweet bell peppers, 1 whole allspice, or different leaves for additional flavor. 
  • Multiply the recipe per yield of cucumbers. 

Nutrition per serving

Serving: 1quartCalories: 169kcalCarbohydrates: 36gProtein: 3gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 1771mgPotassium: 629mgFiber: 3gSugar: 31gVitamin A: 327IUVitamin C: 15mgCalcium: 82mgIron: 1mg

 

New Be featured here!

Hashtag #yesalyonascooking on both Instagram and Pinterest to be seen here!

Leave a comment

Recipe Rating




22 comments

    • Marquita

    Making these tomarrow! Sound so good.

    • Katrina

    How long do they need to sit before eating?

      • Alyona’s Cooking

      It’s best to keep the pickles canned for a month before you open.

    • Cynthia Rogers

    Are any Polish pickles available online to buy!? We used to buy one called Polska Wyrob- but no longer have it?

      • Alyona’s Cooking

      There probably is, just google the name or check other Polish markets.

    • Phyllis

    Are they crispy pickles?

      • Alyona’s Cooking

      Hi, I think it depends on the pickles and how long you process them.

    • Angelina Sinclair

    We must not use the word “brine” amiss and confuse two different food products…. The traditional ” kiszone ogorki” aged in barrels in Poland that you praise are a rarity in the US. Some people know how to make their own. They are an age old way of fermenting and preserving vegetables in a brine (especially for the cold , long winters) to create a gut healthy product full of vitamin C and fermentation bacteria essential for human health. Same with authentic, naturally soured cabbage = sauerkraut. Poland, Russia and Germany have these age old traditions where only water and salt were used to develop the “REAL BRINE”. A naturally souring process.

    What you are giving here, Alyona, is a very nice and tasty – no doubt – recipe for the canned vinegar pickles ( in Polish “ogorki konserwowe”). Vinegar soaked, sugared, brought to a boil and canned – this is a condiment, very popular in the US, called pickles, also in Germany, but this canned product retains no vit. C, has no healthy gut fermentation bacteria value…. it’s a COMPLETELY DIFFERENT animal. Not the ” kiszone ogorki” you are referring to…

    The liquid you describe is not a BRINE for fermenting, it is sugared, vinegared water. No healthy fermentation bacteria can develop in this.

    I feel that it is important to differentiate between these two methods of processing vegetables. The canned and the naturally brined – two very different products.

      • Alyona’s Cooking

      I agree, my apology for the confusion. I was just trying to say you don’t have to ferment pickles to get a sour dill pickle as the vinegar brine is like a shortcut minus all the health benefits of actually fermented cucumbers.

      • Marquita

      Making these tomarrow! Sound so good.
      Could I soak raw cukes in alum water to make them crisper?
      How long?
      What is too much in the alum water? Thanks so much!

        • Alyona’s Cooking

        Hi, I’ve never dealt with aluminum water, not sure how that would work. But I do think soaking the cucumberrs in very cold water and salt can make crisp pickles.

    • Adriana

    Love your photos
    Thanks for the good recipe
    I’ll have to make them one day

You might also like:

Explore Recipes

See What Others Made!
#yesalyonascooking on pinterest or instagram to be featured

Alyona’s Cooking